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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: AR-K: The Great Escape – July 2015 [Score: 7.6]
« Last post by bobdog on October 17, 2017, 04:22:01 PM »
Yeah, this one wasn't too bad.
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: AR-K: The Great Escape – July 2015 [Score: 7.6]
« Last post by Starfox on October 17, 2017, 11:00:43 AM »
Unfortunately I tried to play the first game in the series and that gave me enough incentive to not play the other parts. Didn't even finished it which is pretty uncommon -- I always finish my adventure games... well almost.

However maybe I'll give a try to this one when I find it on a sale.
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on October 16, 2017, 09:27:06 AM »
AR-K: The Great Escape is the third of four episodes in this adventure game series. I understand the first two episodes, which I have not played, are very mediocre, and either way, The Great Escape provides a rundown of what has happened to date.

You play as Alicia, and you live on a utopian spaceship where all your needs are met. But at the end of Episode 2, you went to investigate the mysterious, supposedly non-existent Sector 8, and fell down a garbage shaft. When you awake and start Episode 3, you have to get out of the garbage bin, and formulate a plan to escape back to the upper levels.

Sector 8, in a nutshell, sucks. It is the hidden part of the spaceship on the lower levels, providing all the energy and resources for the utopia above, but built upon the backs of laborers who are worn down and lead dreary lives. You are assigned a position on 16-hour shifts, and any deviation from that position will result in even longer shifts. That makes it pretty hard to escape! Fortunately, one of your friends from up top followed you down to Sector 8, so working together, you can start defining ways to get out.

Puzzles are mostly understandable, and what you say to people will often help your tasks immensely. Several of the tasks were quite fun and stretched my mind, including a murder mystery that you can help solve.

Graphically, the animated characters, backgrounds and cut-scenes are very effective. Music, sound and character voices are all rendered very nicely as well.

This episode was pretty good, but also short at around 3 hours of gameplay. Definitely worth it on a Steam Sale. 7.6 out of 10
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / AR-K: The Great Escape – July 2015 [Score: 7.6]
« Last post by bobdog on October 16, 2017, 09:05:02 AM »
AR-K: The Great Escape is the third of four episodes in this adventure game series. I understand the first two episodes, which I have not played, are very mediocre, and either way, The Great Escape provides a rundown of what has happened to date.

You play as Alicia, and you live on a utopian spaceship where all your needs are met. But at the end of Episode 2, you went to investigate the mysterious, supposedly non-existent Sector 8, and fell down a garbage shaft. When you awake and start Episode 3, you have to get out of the garbage bin, and formulate a plan to escape back to the upper levels.

Sector 8, in a nutshell, sucks. It is the hidden part of the spaceship on the lower levels, providing all the energy and resources for the utopia above, but built upon the backs of laborers who are worn down and lead dreary lives. You are assigned a position on 16-hour shifts, and any deviation from that position will result in even longer shifts. That makes it pretty hard to escape! Fortunately, one of your friends from up top followed you down to Sector 8, so working together, you can start defining ways to get out.

Puzzles are mostly understandable, and what you say to people will often help your tasks immensely. Several of the tasks were quite fun and stretched my mind, including a murder mystery that you can help solve.

Graphically, the animated characters, backgrounds and cut-scenes are very effective. Music, sound and character voices are all rendered very nicely as well.

This episode was pretty good, but also short at around 3 hours of gameplay. Definitely worth it on a Steam Sale. 7.6 out of 10
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on October 09, 2017, 09:37:53 AM »
I’ve been waffling for probably 4 years about getting Venetica, until Steam finally gave me such a great price that I couldn’t resist. My hesitation was that the game looked hack-and-slash like God of War, which aren’t really my favorite type of game. If any reviews had told me that the game was essentially a second cousin to Gothic and Risen, I would have immediately leaped, because those are two of my favorite adventure RPG series.

As the story starts, you play as a young woman named Scarlett and your medieval mountain village is attacked by an unknown force. While you fight valiantly, your boyfriend dies, and you and the survivors are chased across a long wooden bridge to another mountain village. Once you wake up from a dream where you learn that you are the daughter of the actual entity Death, your mission truly starts: you have to free the land from the influence of a necromancer and his determined followers.

The first large map in the mountains serves as a trainer for what you can expect for the rest of the game. You learn how to fight from a local strongman. You explore ruins, abandoned houses and a mine to find special treasures. And once you obtain a special item, you are brought back to the dream world, where your boyfriend gifts you with a new skill to access the ghost world beyond our own.

From the mountains, we make our way to an inn along the coast, and then across the water to a back entrance to the city of Venice. This culminates in our first boss battle against one of the necromancer’s flunkies and opens up Venice. Once inside Venice proper, we meet many new characters with more quests, more treasures, more trainers, and more gear to buy and sell. From several city sections in Venice, we’ll also investigate a dirigible and even another foreign land altogether.

Venetica really does have that Gothic/Risen (and even Witcher) feel to it, both in the level design, fight sequences and overall themes. Levels vary from mountainous terrain to beaches to cities to underground, and each kind of winds around so that you can often end up where you started, or you can look down/up at where you need to go next. Small treasures (and even treasure chests) are hidden all over. Graphically, it feels a lot like Gothic 2 or Risen 1 in layout and design. And although the game is not truly open-world like these, it does have some large map sizes.

The fighting is very similar to both those games, but it adds the element that when you are at the end of your arc, you can hit your attack button again to extend another round of damage, sort of like in Witcher. Also, you must use separate weapon types for worldly and magical foes, just like Witcher.

As an RPG, you can increase certain abilities over time. You’ll also gain key abilities at core moments of the story, when you see your boyfriend again.

The villain’s motivations are understandable, and you realize why his adjutants are all in with his plan. But there is also humor scattered throughout the game to lighten the proceedings.

I really enjoyed my journey through Scarlett’s world. I know I’m scoring Venetica sort of high, but if you like Gothic and Risen, I think you’ll agree with me that this has the same “bones” to it. 7.9 out of 10
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Venetica – September 2009 [Score: 7.9]
« Last post by bobdog on October 09, 2017, 09:33:12 AM »
I’ve been waffling for probably 4 years about getting Venetica, until Steam finally gave me such a great price that I couldn’t resist. My hesitation was that the game looked hack-and-slash like God of War, which aren’t really my favorite type of game. If any reviews had told me that the game was essentially a second cousin to Gothic and Risen, I would have immediately leaped, because those are two of my favorite adventure RPG series.

As the story starts, you play as a young woman named Scarlett and your medieval mountain village is attacked by an unknown force. While you fight valiantly, your boyfriend dies, and you and the survivors are chased across a long wooden bridge to another mountain village. Once you wake up from a dream where you learn that you are the daughter of the actual entity Death, your mission truly starts: you have to free the land from the influence of a necromancer and his determined followers.

The first large map in the mountains serves as a trainer for what you can expect for the rest of the game. You learn how to fight from a local strongman. You explore ruins, abandoned houses and a mine to find special treasures. And once you obtain a special item, you are brought back to the dream world, where your boyfriend gifts you with a new skill to access the ghost world beyond our own.

From the mountains, we make our way to an inn along the coast, and then across the water to a back entrance to the city of Venice. This culminates in our first boss battle against one of the necromancer’s flunkies and opens up Venice. Once inside Venice proper, we meet many new characters with more quests, more treasures, more trainers, and more gear to buy and sell. From several city sections in Venice, we’ll also investigate a dirigible and even another foreign land altogether.

Venetica really does have that Gothic/Risen (and even Witcher) feel to it, both in the level design, fight sequences and overall themes. Levels vary from mountainous terrain to beaches to cities to underground, and each kind of winds around so that you can often end up where you started, or you can look down/up at where you need to go next. Small treasures (and even treasure chests) are hidden all over. Graphically, it feels a lot like Gothic 2 or Risen 1 in layout and design. And although the game is not truly open-world like these, it does have some large map sizes.

The fighting is very similar to both those games, but it adds the element that when you are at the end of your arc, you can hit your attack button again to extend another round of damage, sort of like in Witcher. Also, you must use separate weapon types for worldly and magical foes, just like Witcher.

As an RPG, you can increase certain abilities over time. You’ll also gain key abilities at core moments of the story, when you see your boyfriend again.

The villain’s motivations are understandable, and you realize why his adjutants are all in with his plan. But there is also humor scattered throughout the game to lighten the proceedings.

I really enjoyed my journey through Scarlett’s world. I know I’m scoring Venetica sort of high, but if you like Gothic and Risen, I think you’ll agree with me that this has the same “bones” to it. 7.9 out of 10
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on October 02, 2017, 07:46:27 PM »
I just can’t recommend White Night, and I even got it on sale. I wanted to like the extreme contrast vibe with the noir feel, but the gameplay is just too plodding to waste time on. In the first “chapter”, after a car accident, you move at a snail’s pace to try and find a key to the front door of a huge mansion. Once inside, you are finally able to move faster, but that’s only a temporary relief.

The main problem is the constantly switching camera angles, which throw off your direction sense. On numerous occasions, I’d move towards the right to try and look at something, then the camera angle would switch so that now I’m moving out of the scene again and back to where I originally started. You literally can only go a couple of paces, stop all movement, let the scene change, and then start moving again a couple of paces, stop all movement, let the scene change, ad infinitum.

Games like this just piss me off. This is only for the patient and only on an extreme sale. 5.9 out of 10
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bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / White Night – March 2015 [Score: 5.9]
« Last post by bobdog on October 02, 2017, 07:45:27 PM »
I just can’t recommend White Night, and I even got it on sale. I wanted to like the extreme contrast vibe with the noir feel, but the gameplay is just too plodding to waste time on. In the first “chapter”, after a car accident, you move at a snail’s pace to try and find a key to the front door of a huge mansion. Once inside, you are finally able to move faster, but that’s only a temporary relief.

The main problem is the constantly switching camera angles, which throw off your direction sense. On numerous occasions, I’d move towards the right to try and look at something, then the camera angle would switch so that now I’m moving out of the scene again and back to where I originally started. You literally can only go a couple of paces, stop all movement, let the scene change, and then start moving again a couple of paces, stop all movement, let the scene change, ad infinitum.

Games like this just piss me off. This is only for the patient and only on an extreme sale. 5.9 out of 10
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The Foxhole Gaming News Discussions / Re: Creation Club is LIVE! Everybody REJOICE!
« Last post by Starfox on October 02, 2017, 03:28:33 AM »
And for reference, Gopher pointed out a few absolutely essential mods related to that:

As you can guess from the video, Gopher is not pleased with the Creation Club... but who is?
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I heard about the Survival Mode and the first things that came to mind was Frostfall...yup: free. I'm not sure how they can justify charging for a mod that hasn't exactly been as extensively tested as Frostfall, but I'm pretty sure it won't be as well-regarded, if at all.

(I don't play with survival mods, btw...I feel the game is inconvenient enough without adding to my troubles.)

On a side note, I saw that they're selling Doomguy armor for FO4, and I was greatly underwhelmed. Low-res ridiculous crap. Obviously it's up to Bethesda's standards, as it looks terrible.  ::)
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