Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on December 17, 2018, 11:27:47 AM »
Dangerous Golf is brutal and pretty, but ultimately boring. Basically it’s “bull in a china shop” gameplay where you have a flaming golf ball that you can hit at various everyday objects. I got bored 5 minutes in, but to get my Steam cards, I had to play for an additional hour.

Graphically, the game is very pretty, and manages the destruction elements nicely whenever your ball hits things. I only opened levels in a French sitting room and a commercial kitchen. Besides sinking the ball, you have additional goals for each level, and the more destruction you do, the higher your score (and thus medal type). After causing sufficient destruction, your ball may go “nuclear” and destroy all surrounding objects. But at the end, you still have to get the ball in the hole, whether as a straight putt, or maybe bouncing it off multiple walls (also with corresponding point upgrades).

Ultimately, it just wasn’t that fun, no matter how much destruction I caused. 5.7 out of 10
2
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Dangerous Golf – June 2016 [Score: 5.7]
« Last post by bobdog on December 17, 2018, 11:24:06 AM »
Dangerous Golf is brutal and pretty, but ultimately boring. Basically it’s “bull in a china shop” gameplay where you have a flaming golf ball that you can hit at various everyday objects. I got bored 5 minutes in, but to get my Steam cards, I had to play for an additional hour.

Graphically, the game is very pretty, and manages the destruction elements nicely whenever your ball hits things. I only opened levels in a French sitting room and a commercial kitchen. Besides sinking the ball, you have additional goals for each level, and the more destruction you do, the higher your score (and thus medal type). After causing sufficient destruction, your ball may go “nuclear” and destroy all surrounding objects. But at the end, you still have to get the ball in the hole, whether as a straight putt, or maybe bouncing it off multiple walls (also with corresponding point upgrades).

Ultimately, it just wasn’t that fun, no matter how much destruction I caused. 5.7 out of 10
3
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Near Death – August 2016 [Score: 8.6]
« Last post by bobdog on December 12, 2018, 11:54:34 AM »
I think playing it while the snow is whipping up outside and the temperatures are in the teens is the perfect time!! :-)
4
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Near Death – August 2016 [Score: 8.6]
« Last post by Starfox on December 11, 2018, 12:11:57 PM »
Well, this is definitely the kind of game I'd tend to play during Summer  :lol:
5
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on December 10, 2018, 04:29:16 PM »
I was immensely satisfied with Near Death, and it is probably best suited for a long afternoon of continuous gameplay to really craft the best experience.

Near Death finds you as an Antarctic pilot named Kate who has crashlanded. After waking, you realize you need to find shelter quickly in the sub-zero temperatures, or else you will freeze to death. Upon locating a communications building and gathering a propane heater, you’re ready to take stock of your situation. A teletype machine allows you to communicate with your dispatcher at home base. Unfortunately, the dispatcher warns of a coming storm that will keep any aerial rescue at bay, possibly for weeks. You will need to hunker down and survive on what remains at the station, although it has undergone stripping of its resources in order to be closed.

Thus starts a frantic 5 to 6 hour game, where you must explore other parts of the station to see what remains, and how you will survive. Are there enough water and food resources, or will you have to find an alternate means of leaving? Collecting wire, electronics, tarps, rope, tape and more will enable you to craft items you’ll need to block windows, restart downed generators, and even craft warmer clothing to protect your internal heat. You’ll also need propane bottles to ensure your heater never runs out. But once you turn on a building’s generators, and ensure all the windows are blocked, they will generate their own heat.

I really enjoyed the challenge presented by being in such a dangerous destination. Several times I got lost and had to re-acquire my path before I froze. I also run out of supplies at the start of the game and actually died in between buildings. And a windy cable-walk late in the game left me sweating in reality at how close I’d come to dying.

Near Death utilizes the sub-freezing temperatures of the Antarctic as a credible foil for all your efforts at survival. Being alone, other than some teletype conversations with your dispatcher, plus the oppressive darkness and howling wind, really brought the game to life for me. Highly recommended. 8.6 out of 10
6
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Near Death – August 2016 [Score: 8.6]
« Last post by bobdog on December 10, 2018, 04:26:28 PM »
I was immensely satisfied with Near Death, and it is probably best suited for a long afternoon of continuous gameplay to really craft the best experience.

Near Death finds you as an Antarctic pilot named Kate who has crashlanded. After waking, you realize you need to find shelter quickly in the sub-zero temperatures, or else you will freeze to death. Upon locating a communications building and gathering a propane heater, you’re ready to take stock of your situation. A teletype machine allows you to communicate with your dispatcher at home base. Unfortunately, the dispatcher warns of a coming storm that will keep any aerial rescue at bay, possibly for weeks. You will need to hunker down and survive on what remains at the station, although it has undergone stripping of its resources in order to be closed.

Thus starts a frantic 5 to 6 hour game, where you must explore other parts of the station to see what remains, and how you will survive. Are there enough water and food resources, or will you have to find an alternate means of leaving? Collecting wire, electronics, tarps, rope, tape and more will enable you to craft items you’ll need to block windows, restart downed generators, and even craft warmer clothing to protect your internal heat. You’ll also need propane bottles to ensure your heater never runs out. But once you turn on a building’s generators, and ensure all the windows are blocked, they will generate their own heat.

I really enjoyed the challenge presented by being in such a dangerous destination. Several times I got lost and had to re-acquire my path before I froze. I also run out of supplies at the start of the game and actually died in between buildings. And a windy cable-walk late in the game left me sweating in reality at how close I’d come to dying.

Near Death utilizes the sub-freezing temperatures of the Antarctic as a credible foil for all your efforts at survival. Being alone, other than some teletype conversations with your dispatcher, plus the oppressive darkness and howling wind, really brought the game to life for me. Highly recommended. 8.6 out of 10
7
RPG Games / Re: Meanwhile... in The Outer Worlds
« Last post by Silver Sorrow on December 08, 2018, 01:26:40 AM »
That, and it makes me think of Fallout New Space Vegas, which I am perfectly okay with.  :ok:

Just from the look on that woman's face after you find out you didn't have to shoot either one...I'm in.
8
RPG Games / Re: Meanwhile... in The Outer Worlds
« Last post by Doc_Brown on December 07, 2018, 05:42:53 PM »
I like that Obisidian saw fit to point out in the trailer that they were the original creators of Fallout and developers of Fallout: New Vegas.   However The Outer Worlds turns out, it makes for an amusing "take that" to Bethesda and all that's been happening with them of late.  :funup:
9
RPG Games / Meanwhile... in The Outer Worlds
« Last post by Starfox on December 07, 2018, 10:17:48 AM »
Well, while Bethesda is drowning under an ocean of bad decisions Obsidian Entertainment reveals their next game: The Outer Worlds that might well be stealing the light away from the uncertain (and now commercially compromised) Starfield.

From the first info that was given by Obsidian, The Outer Worlds is a first person RPG with old schools mechanics and a new skin. The main protagonist is not voiced which will please a lot of fans who didn't like Fallout 4 voiced protagonist because a non voiced protagonist allows players to be the character they want to be and not a typical character that can't really be different from playthrough to playthrough. There is a return of the skills and a conversation tree similar to Fallout: New Vegas but at the same time the combat appears to be somewhat similar to Fallout 4, VATS equivalent included, which is a good thing as far as I'm concerned because combat is one of the few areas of FO4 I don't have any problem with.

There's no romance and Obsidian explained why they chose to not retain this option and I can't say that I disagree with them. They want the player to completely role-play the game and not be constrained by the necessity to "please" the character you'd like to sleep with... so no romance even though that may not be to the taste of a part of the gamers. There are companions though.

More to follow I guess... And I certainly will keep an eye on this one.

Ooh... I forgot the bit about the story... So apparently humanity launched a few colony ships to outer space but the one your character was on, the second one, got delayed by an unknown event for seventy years. Normally cryogenic pods can't keep people alive for more than a decade but a genius on your ship find a way to preserve them and revive you. He will ask for your help in finding the resources to revive the other colonists on your ship but as this is an old school RPG you may feel free to betray him, to work for the almighty corporations, to become kind of a freedom fighter or a bloody mercenary or to blow everyone up... your choice.
10
RPG Games / Re: The elephant in the room (or the grenade in the shitter)
« Last post by Starfox on December 07, 2018, 09:44:14 AM »
Is Bethesda trying to perform Seppuku in public? I mean at this point I don't really know anymore. A few days ago Bethesda finally decided to issue to owners of the Power Armor Edition the bags that were promised -- why I don't really know, possibly because they didn't want the hassle of a class action lawsuit. Then they asked owners of the PAE to log into their support website to claim their replacement bag and then... then the support tickets appeared publicly with the name, details and credit card type of the said users.

At this point that becomes really hilarious. They try to fix properly a decision that they shouldn't have taken in the first place, but doing so they generate another bigger issue. It's like if they adapted the philosophy of their game patches to their business... You know the "we fix it but break a bunch of other things at the same time" way. Bethesda stated that no card number was displayed but sorry... the display of users names and personal details is already bad enough as it is. And it's not like if they were hacked... Everything points to a website badly programmed.

The only thing missing is "Power Armor Edition helmet badly manufactured... A user died suffocated"  ::)
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10