Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on April 22, 2019, 07:25:31 AM »
Man, this game is short!! Perils of Man clocks in right around 3 hours, which included at least 30 minutes or more in cut-scenes, including the whole finale, in which you walk around for 1 minute, and then it cuts into a 15-minute cut-scene where you never take the reins again.

The story premise is interesting: you play as Ana, a teenager who has been cooped up in your house for a decade since your father mysteriously went missing. Your mother, who claims to see his ghost on occasion, is afraid to let you out of her sight as all the scientists in your family – going back 4 generations – have all gone missing under mysterious circumstances. And you, as a teen, are only too happy to try and find an escape. When your mother provides a surprise 16th birthday gift that she found addressed from your father, that spurs you to try and solve those mysteries.

You must complete several point-and-click puzzles, find objects and install them in a new location, etc. – nothing extremely nonsensical, but some of the objects were more challenging to find. Eventually, you’ll make your way into a hidden lab and workshop, where you’ll reconstruct Darwin, a walking bird-robot that provides backstory, banter, and even a link with your great-great-great-grandfather Thomas. Thomas informs you that with special looking glasses, you can make an assessment of risks, and even travel into the past to change the fate of certain key disasters. You might even find your father!

Artistically, the game presents like some of the old LucasArts games, with a colorful but wonky style; i.e. extended lines, slightly off-kilter angles, cartoonish designs. I did have some significant difficulty in pixel-hunting key objects, such that I had to visit a walk-through to see what I’d missed. Later in the game, you are supposed to search an area, but the mouse pointer isn’t right on the mark; a catch-all “one-button highlight” would have been appreciated to show you all the areas where you can interact.

Another issue I had was in simple navigation. The screen is so “short” that you had to constantly click ahead of where you were walking, and you couldn’t speed up or instantly materialize to an exit by double-clicking. It was annoying enough that I noticed it and felt it was a waste of time.

After visiting two previous disasters, you finally come to the third and final disaster. At this point, you walk around for a few seconds, make the only decision possible, and then the finale cut-scene takes over. I felt the game was extremely short, and never really allowed me to connect with the more interesting part of the game – solving these disasters. But the game does actually discuss the merits of letting a few suffer in order to save the many, which was an interesting take.

Perils of Man is not a “bad” game per se, but it is woefully short. I’d only get it on a deep sale. 6.5 out of 10
2
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Perils of Man – April 2015 [Score: 6.5]
« Last post by bobdog on April 22, 2019, 07:06:30 AM »
Man, this game is short!! Perils of Man clocks in right around 3 hours, which included at least 30 minutes or more in cut-scenes, including the whole finale, in which you walk around for 1 minute, and then it cuts into a 15-minute cut-scene where you never take the reins again.

The story premise is interesting: you play as Ana, a teenager who has been cooped up in your house for a decade since your father mysteriously went missing. Your mother, who claims to see his ghost on occasion, is afraid to let you out of her sight as all the scientists in your family – going back 4 generations – have all gone missing under mysterious circumstances. And you, as a teen, are only too happy to try and find an escape. When your mother provides a surprise 16th birthday gift that she found addressed from your father, that spurs you to try and solve those mysteries.

You must complete several point-and-click puzzles, find objects and install them in a new location, etc. – nothing extremely nonsensical, but some of the objects were more challenging to find. Eventually, you’ll make your way into a hidden lab and workshop, where you’ll reconstruct Darwin, a walking bird-robot that provides backstory, banter, and even a link with your great-great-great-grandfather Thomas. Thomas informs you that with special looking glasses, you can make an assessment of risks, and even travel into the past to change the fate of certain key disasters. You might even find your father!

Artistically, the game presents like some of the old LucasArts games, with a colorful but wonky style; i.e. extended lines, slightly off-kilter angles, cartoonish designs. I did have some significant difficulty in pixel-hunting key objects, such that I had to visit a walk-through to see what I’d missed. Later in the game, you are supposed to search an area, but the mouse pointer isn’t right on the mark; a catch-all “one-button highlight” would have been appreciated to show you all the areas where you can interact.

Another issue I had was in simple navigation. The screen is so “short” that you had to constantly click ahead of where you were walking, and you couldn’t speed up or instantly materialize to an exit by double-clicking. It was annoying enough that I noticed it and felt it was a waste of time.

After visiting two previous disasters, you finally come to the third and final disaster. At this point, you walk around for a few seconds, make the only decision possible, and then the finale cut-scene takes over. I felt the game was extremely short, and never really allowed me to connect with the more interesting part of the game – solving these disasters. But the game does actually discuss the merits of letting a few suffer in order to save the many, which was an interesting take.

Perils of Man is not a “bad” game per se, but it is woefully short. I’d only get it on a deep sale. 6.5 out of 10
3
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Re: Bobdog's Mini-Reviews Thread
« Last post by bobdog on April 15, 2019, 09:25:55 AM »
Oxenfree is a hard game to peg down – sort of a fantastical coming-of-age sidescroller mystery, if you will. You, your new step-brother, and your best friend start the journey on a boat shuttling you to a nearby island, so that you can have a party with some other friends. It’s a right of passage, apparently, to stay overnight on the island. And your best friend Ren says there are some weird goings-on that you just have to check out.

Probably what catches your attention most is the art-style, which almost feels like a painting, but then the characters feel a bit “cartoonish” in style, and certainly in the thought bubbles that sprout from their head. But it’s an attractive enough look, at any rate.

The story follows 5 teenagers around, and feels mostly realistic of high schooler dialogue, but with some big thoughts and ideas tossed in. The introduction of the step-brother is a big issue with Ren, and you’re caught between having to “diss” him or stand up for him, even though you’ve really only just met. And the fact that he’s even in your life is due to the loss of your original brother, who dated one of the other girls on the trip. There are a lot of heady topics for anyone to tackle, let alone a high schooler.

And then things get weird.

Ren has asked you to bring a radio with manual knobs. Supposedly at certain locations on the island, you can tune in the radio to otherworldly messages. What you hear will surprise you and change the whole course of events for the night.

You do a lot of listening to your friends as you walk … slowly … from one end of the island to the other. Did you know there was a military base on the island? Or that they were supposedly doing weird experiments? Or that the rich old lady who lived in the mansion by the sea never left the island … like ever?

The game is relatively short and has some replayability so that you can perhaps uncover more of the mysteries of the island. I won’t go into spoilers, but one thing I’d recommend is that if you happen to see yourself in the past, write down the answers you give. You never know when you’ll need to remember what you said….  :lol:

Definitely worth a play. 7.8 out of 10
4
bobdog's Mini-Reviews Corner / Oxenfree – January 2016 [Score: 7.8]
« Last post by bobdog on April 15, 2019, 09:25:12 AM »
Oxenfree is a hard game to peg down – sort of a fantastical coming-of-age sidescroller mystery, if you will. You, your new step-brother, and your best friend start the journey on a boat shuttling you to a nearby island, so that you can have a party with some other friends. It’s a right of passage, apparently, to stay overnight on the island. And your best friend Ren says there are some weird goings-on that you just have to check out.

Probably what catches your attention most is the art-style, which almost feels like a painting, but then the characters feel a bit “cartoonish” in style, and certainly in the thought bubbles that sprout from their head. But it’s an attractive enough look, at any rate.

The story follows 5 teenagers around, and feels mostly realistic of high schooler dialogue, but with some big thoughts and ideas tossed in. The introduction of the step-brother is a big issue with Ren, and you’re caught between having to “diss” him or stand up for him, even though you’ve really only just met. And the fact that he’s even in your life is due to the loss of your original brother, who dated one of the other girls on the trip. There are a lot of heady topics for anyone to tackle, let alone a high schooler.

And then things get weird.

Ren has asked you to bring a radio with manual knobs. Supposedly at certain locations on the island, you can tune in the radio to otherworldly messages. What you hear will surprise you and change the whole course of events for the night.

You do a lot of listening to your friends as you walk … slowly … from one end of the island to the other. Did you know there was a military base on the island? Or that they were supposedly doing weird experiments? Or that the rich old lady who lived in the mansion by the sea never left the island … like ever?

The game is relatively short and has some replayability so that you can perhaps uncover more of the mysteries of the island. I won’t go into spoilers, but one thing I’d recommend is that if you happen to see yourself in the past, write down the answers you give. You never know when you’ll need to remember what you said….  :lol:

Definitely worth a play. 7.8 out of 10
5
What's funny is that when I initially reviewed Mordor, I had the same impression.  It wasn't until I played War that I realized I may have been too hard on Mordor.  Not that I'm encouraging you to waste money, but I appreciate the first game more because I didn't enjoy the sequel.
6
The Foxhole QuickViews / Re: Middle-earth series [2014-2017 -- Monolith Productions]
« Last post by bobdog on April 11, 2019, 10:42:09 PM »
I barely managed to finish Mordor due to an underwhelming experience overall (yes, the Nemesis system was great, but everything else including location: meh). So I don't feel I even have to play War. Thanks for saving me some dough!!  :funup:
7
The Foxhole QuickViews / Re: Silver's Project: Play My Games
« Last post by Silver Sorrow on April 05, 2019, 08:50:05 AM »
"One of the colonies needs our help..."

That's it. No more, people...take up the cry! No Space Minutemen! No Space Minutemen!

I actually liked the build-a-house-in-every-city aspect (although OB and Skyrim could've had more design choices), and Fallout 4's settlement sandboxing is the only real reason I still have it installed. But just...just stop sending me to deliver settlers from evil, Bethesda.

As for the "reviews," I may have overdosed on the sarcasm. It's kind of a reaction to the misty-eyed look the MW fan gets when someone says "Seyda Neen;" Cthulhu knows I'm one of them. At first, Indignation: "how DARE he insult the most holy and inviolate Morrowind?!" And then, Realization: "Oh. I see where he's going with this." And finally, Disgust: "This guy should be put to sleep."

Next, I might say a few words about the Fallout games, and I promise my comments will be ill-informed and asinine. :ok:
8
The Foxhole QuickViews / Re: Silver's Project: Play My Games
« Last post by Starfox on April 05, 2019, 06:42:57 AM »
Quote
Then Bethesda went nuts and made houses available in every city in Oblivion... ::)

And they started to make you build them in Skyrim then switch to whole settlements in Fallout 4. Next thing you know Starfield will have you put a colony on every planet you come to.

Original "reviews" to say the least. So what I take from that is that you hate Bethesda, all of their games... and the universe as a matter of principle...

Who would have thought  :purplelaugh:
9
The Foxhole QuickViews / The Elder Scrolls
« Last post by Silver Sorrow on April 05, 2019, 01:58:32 AM »
The Elder Scrolls

I have Arena (#1) and Daggerfall (#2) [as well as Battlespire (#2 1/2)], but I haven't found the motivation to play 'em just yet. Maybe some day. That leaves...

#3: Morrowind.
MW is absolute crap. I hated every minute of its convoluted plot, its hugely exploratory gameplay, and its insanely extensive modding scene. I cannot begin to express how much I regret buying the GOTY version several different times, nor could I mask the shame of cobbling together my own substandard mod for it. If I had any honor, I would ritually disembowel myself in public to expiate my sins in the eyes of society. Then again, this is a society that thinks that anyone with two IQ points to rub together gives a rat's ass about hip hop stars' lives, so to hell with it.

Expansions: Bloodmoon and Tribunal.
Bitch, please. I can't be bothered to care about these wonderful things that would have brought me joy if I weren't such a miserable waste of skin.

Also...: Free Mods.
On their site, Bethesda had several free mods, such as the Adamantium Helm Of Lindsay Lohan, or whatever. They didn't charge a dime for them. Stupid bastards.

#4: Oblivion.
Even worse. From the gorgeous landscapes to the improved combat, Oblivion is a blight upon the land. The developers should have been tossed into a woodchipper for their impudence, especially for the execrably delightful Dark Brotherhood questline.

In the spirit of full disclosure...to my eternal embarrassment, I made a mod or two for Oblivion. I hang my head in shame.

Expansions...Whoops, Gotta Call 'Em "DLC" Now: Shivering Isles, Mehrunes' Razor, Knights Of The Nine, Horse Armor, Etc.
While Shivering Isles, with its massive footprint, was a complete waste of the universe's time, I heartily applaud Bethesda's obvious cash-grab philosophy behind the superlatively insipid Horse Armor and the even more beautifully useless Spell Tomes. These, plus the invaluably valueless Orrery showed that Bethesda was unafraid to [CENSORED] the fanbase in the [CENSORED] by blatantly cutting parts of the game out so as to add them back in later for a couple bucks each (thus inventing an industry standard!). Bite the pillow, bitches!

And then you had the Thieves Den, Vile Lair, Knights of the Nine, and Mehrunes' Razor, which were horrible and awful and just blech. I paid for all of them and goddammit, I should just fling myself from the highest turret for my stupidity.

And there were others. Something about a wizard's tower and a huge castle...I don't know. I was too busy gnawing at my wrists.

#5: Skyrim.
The worst of the lot. Combat, exploration, dragons...Christ, who can stand such an embarrassment of gaming riches?

I will say that Bethesda's decision to make it even dumber than Oblivion's already streamlined-from-Morrowind plot and gaming mechanics is a step in the right direction. Perhaps TES VI will feature just one of each major type of skill: Weapon, Magic, Other. Pass a speech check? Your Other skill has increased! Yay!

However, it's such a piece of crap that I absolutely have not spent 3,195 hours playing it, despite what Steam says. Lies. Damnable lies.

DLC: Dawnguard, Dragonborn, Hearthfires.
I can't believe you would be so cruel as to mention them. I hate you.

Summary:
I think I had experiences. Most likely.

But Seriously, Folks...
I still remember the first housing mod I installed for Morrowind. I don't remember the name of it (and you probably can't even find it anywhere), but it was this beautiful little house that used the Mournhold architecture. But since there wasn't fast travel in MW, I had to figure out how to make my own insta-teleport ring, as the house was on an island that was in the same general hemisphere as Seyda Neen. It was a bit of a swim/waterwalk, so to speak. (Visions of using the bobbing corpses of slaughterfish and dreugh as stepping stones to get there...) That worked, so I made one for the Japanese House mod...which was my absolutely favorite house mod. I guess I just got tired of storing all my stuff on Caius Cosades' roof, so I needed a house.

Then Bethesda went nuts and made houses available in every city in Oblivion... ::)
10
The Foxhole QuickViews / Re: Silver's Project: Play My Games
« Last post by Silver Sorrow on April 05, 2019, 12:47:06 AM »
Quote
For Borderlands, the game was first and foremost designed for coop play with at least four people

I had my suspicions.  :hammerhead:  And I'll take a look at that app...

I don't have Tales from the Borderlands, but I'll take a look at that too.

Doom? Well. It could've been worse. But when compared to Doom 3: the movement speed and weapons are better, but I preferred Doom 3's atmosphere.

So I've been playing a couple of other things that I never bothered with before...I'll get to those later. Maybe I should mention a couple I've never even considered reviewing, even though I've put hundreds of hours into each of them...
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
everything